4 Things You Need to Know If the Police Try To Search Your Phone

Good advice for if you ever have to deal with the police, irrespective of you’re guilt or innocence.

1. Keep your smartphone locked.

If they ask you to unlock it, you have every right to refuse. And this way, should you be stuck in handcuffs, they won’t be able to pore through your phone even if they wanted to.

2. Calmly repeat the following: “I do not consent to this search.”

Repeating the phrase means there’s no room for any ambiguity. And staying calm means (hopefully) no angry officers.

3. If you’re not under arrest, really don’t consent.

While a warrantless search of your phone when you’re under arrest is illegal, doing so when you’re not under arrest is extra illegal.

4. If the officer still ignores you, whatever you do, don’t get physical in any way.

If you’re at the point where a cop has snatched your phone from you, you’re probably in the middle of being arrested. And in those situations, physically intervening is just about the worst thing you can do. Remember the cop’s name for later, because even if they find anything questionable, the cop can’t use it if it was obtained illegally.

via 4 Things You Need to Know If the Police Try To Search Your Phone.

One last bit of advice; you have the right to remain silent, so do so. Don’t talk to the police at all.

Why Big Media Fears of the Tea Party are Irrational

In his views about the minimum wage, Social Security and Medicare, Brat is a fairly conventional libertarian, but he became the first candidate to oust a sitting House majority leader since the post was created in 1899 not by speaking the libertarian argot of Ayn Rand and Friedrich von Hayek but by deploying the populist language of Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson and William Jennings Bryan.

With that kind of talk, Brat and like-minded militants on the right are undermining the philosophy of market populism that has united the Main Street and Wall Street wings of the Republican party since the days of Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan. Market populism recycles the ideology of classic Jeffersonian populism—but expands the definition of the virtuous, self-reliant yeoman to include not only small business owners but also big business executives and capitalists. According to market populism, the virtuous yeomanry consists of family farmers and small, owner-operated businesses—and CEOs of multinational corporations and billionaire investment bankers and heirs and heiresses who inherited their wealth, like Paris Hilton.

Sooner or later the authentic Jeffersonians in the market populist coalition were bound to notice that the actual agenda of conservative politicians has less to do with the needs of small business owners and small farmers than with the desires of big companies and the financial industry—more H1-B indentured servants for Silicon Valley tech oligopolies, the defense of the “carried interest” loophole for Wall Street hedge fund managers. With their attacks on “crony capitalism,” “corporate welfare” and “corporatism,” angry outsiders on the right are threatening to replace business-friendly market populism with real populism.

And that, to the business community, is downright terrifying.

via Why Big Business Fears the Tea Party – Michael Lind – POLITICO Magazine.

WikiLeaks Show WMD Hunt Continued in Iraq – With Surprising Results | Danger Room | WIRED

By late 2003, even the Bush White House’s staunchest defenders were starting to give up on the idea that there were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

But WikiLeaks’ newly-released Iraq war documents reveal that for years afterward, U.S. troops continued to find chemical weapons labs, encounter insurgent specialists in toxins and uncover weapons of mass destruction.

An initial glance at the WikiLeaks war logs doesn’t reveal evidence of some massive WMD program by the Saddam Hussein regime — the Bush administration’s most (in)famous rationale for invading Iraq. But chemical weapons, especially, did not vanish from the Iraqi battlefield. Remnants of Saddam’s toxic arsenal, largely destroyed after the Gulf War, remained. Jihadists, insurgents and foreign (possibly Iranian) agitators turned to these stockpiles during the Iraq conflict — and may have brewed up their own deadly agents.

via WikiLeaks Show WMD Hunt Continued in Iraq – With Surprising Results | Danger Room | WIRED.

When science gets it wrong: Let the light shine in | The Economist

SCIENTISTS make much of the fact that their work is scrutinised anonymously by some of their peers before it is published. This “peer review” is supposed to spot mistakes and thus keep the whole process honest. The peers in question, though, are necessarily few in number, are busy with their own work, are expected to act unpaid—and are often the rivals of those whose work they are scrutinising. And so, by a mixture of deliberation and technological pressure, the system is starting to change. The internet means anyone can appoint himself a peer and criticise work that has entered the public domain. And two recent incidents have shown how valuable this can be.

via When science gets it wrong: Let the light shine in | The Economist.

IRS Commissioner John Koskinen Misled Congress During Spring Testimony


In this video, taken on March 26th, 2014, Rep. Trey Gowdy asks IRS Commissioner John Koskinen how soon he could provided the requested emails, and Koskinen responds it would take some time to screen those emails for “6103 material.”

In the video below, which was taken on June 20th, 2014, Koskinen states near the 1:30 mark that he purposely withheld information from congress about state of the emails, which means on March 26th, 2014, John Koskinen lied to Trey Gowdy.

The Smearing Of Scott Walker

The demonization of Walker is pervasive, and so-called “John Doe” investigations always have been an integral part of that effort. The mere pendency of such investigations is a critical part of anti-Walker messaging.

“John Doe” investigations in Wisconsin have been around for over a century, but only recently have they been used as political tools. Everything surrounding these types of investigations is secretive. They are commenced with a secret request to a judge, and a judge has to approve subpoenas.

Neither the persons who are the focus of the investigation nor persons subpoenaed are permitted to disclose to others any information about the existence or conduct of the investigation.

via Media Aids And Abets Left-Wing Smear Of Governor Scott Walker | The Daily Caller.

Clinton Donor Bans Free Beacon From University of Arkansas Archives | Washington Free Beacon

A Hillary Clinton donor who serves as dean of the University of Arkansas libraries has banned the Washington Free Beacon from the school’s special collections archives, after the news outlet published revealing stories about Hillary Clinton based on documents available at the university library.

via Clinton Donor Bans Free Beacon From University of Arkansas Archives | Washington Free Beacon.

ISIS storms non-existent Saddam-era chemical weapons complex in Iraq

The jihadist group bringing terror to Iraq overran a Saddam Hussein chemical weapons complex on Thursday, gaining access to disused stores of hundreds of tonnes of potentially deadly poisons including mustard gas and sarin.

Isis invaded the al-Muthanna mega-facility 60 miles north of Baghdad in a rapid takeover that the US government said was a matter of concern.

The facility was notorious in the 1980s and 1990s as the locus of Saddam’s industrial scale efforts to develop a chemical weapons development programme.

via Isis storms Saddam-era chemical weapons complex in Iraq – Telegraph.

In the end, the delusional ones are those who believe Saddam’s Iraq didn’t have these weapons.  Admittedly, Saddam used a lot of deceit and misdirection in order to hide the state of Iraq’s weapons programs after 1991, but no one made up the fact Iraq has these weapons.

The lie, if you can call it that, was one of expectations.  It was expected, especially in media circles, we’d find a warehouse filled with neatly stacked racks of chemical shells, biological delivery systems or something of that nature.

By late 2003, even the Bush White House’s staunchest defenders were starting to give up on the idea that there were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

But WikiLeaks’ newly-released Iraq war documents reveal that for years afterward, U.S. troops continued to find chemical weapons labs, encounter insurgent specialists in toxins and uncover weapons of mass destruction.

An initial glance at the WikiLeaks war logs doesn’t reveal evidence of some massive WMD program by the Saddam Hussein regime — the Bush administration’s most (in)famous rationale for invading Iraq. But chemical weapons, especially, did not vanish from the Iraqi battlefield. Remnants of Saddam’s toxic arsenal, largely destroyed after the Gulf War, remained. Jihadists, insurgents and foreign (possibly Iranian) agitators turned to these stockpiles during the Iraq conflict — and may have brewed up their own deadly agents.

via WikiLeaks Show WMD Hunt Continued in Iraq – With Surprising Results | Danger Room | WIRED.

The weapons existed, but they were scattered about and hidden. Nuclear centrifuges buried in backyards, jets buried in the middle of the desert or petri dishes in the back of home freezers.

Outside of the political squabbling, someone needs to open their eyes, and realize that while it might be convenient and fun for political reasons to pretend these weapons never existed, in the Middle East people don’t live with that illusion.