As Seen On The Internet… 2017-04-25

As Seen On The Internet

I’m sitting at work searching the internet for information on why file copying using Group Policies is failing, and my eyelids started to grow heavy… and heavier… and coffee isn’t workings… and fuck, I’m on Twitter… where I saw this.

Not only is this guy not funny, but this cringe worthy performance is, quite literally, racist.

“How so,” you might ask. Glad you asked.

What if a white comedian started lambasting black girls with blond hair.

Seen on the internet - Beyonce

“Black people, what is it with straightening your hair and making it blond? And speaking English, using the computer, and driving cars?”

That’s so cringy I had a hard time writing it… But I’ll have more thoughts on this to come.

Back to work.

Well stated, sir.

Honey, don’t ask me to be your knight in shining armour if you’re not going to be my chaste princess.

As Seen On The Internet… 2017-04-24

As Seen On The Internet

I came across this one the internet today. The origin might not be genuine, but it’s so ironic, it’s hard not to believe it’s real.

Antifa conversation on the internet

Isn’t that the exact same type of stereotyping and generalizing they claim to hate coming from the right wing?

 

Who Am I To Argue With Science?

The #1 way a man can boost his life expectancy

Stare at boobs

It may seem like an inconvenience, or an invasion of privacy, to many women but staring at boobs creates a positive mindset in men.

The same effect occurs when they look at cute animals.

A 2012 study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, looked at the effects positive thinking had on men’s health.

After a year, positive thinking had a powerful effect on health choices.

More than half of the patients with coronary artery disease increased their physical activity versus 37 percent in the control group, who were not asked to write down positive thoughts in the morning.

The same happened in men with high blood pressure.

More than 40 percent of those with high blood pressure followed their medication plan compared to 36 percent in the non-positive thinking group.