As Seen On The Internet… 2017-04-25

As Seen On The Internet

I’m sitting at work searching the internet for information on why file copying using Group Policies is failing, and my eyelids started to grow heavy… and heavier… and coffee isn’t workings… and fuck, I’m on Twitter… where I saw this.

Not only is this guy not funny, but this cringe worthy performance is, quite literally, racist.

“How so,” you might ask. Glad you asked.

What if a white comedian started lambasting black girls with blond hair.

Seen on the internet - Beyonce

“Black people, what is it with straightening your hair and making it blond? And speaking English, using the computer, and driving cars?”

That’s so cringy I had a hard time writing it… But I’ll have more thoughts on this to come.

Back to work.

Well stated, sir.

Honey, don’t ask me to be your knight in shining armour if you’re not going to be my chaste princess.

As Seen On The Internet… 2017-04-24

As Seen On The Internet

I came across this one the internet today. The origin might not be genuine, but it’s so ironic, it’s hard not to believe it’s real.

Antifa conversation on the internet

Isn’t that the exact same type of stereotyping and generalizing they claim to hate coming from the right wing?

 

Security expert calls home routers a clear and present danger | Ars Technica

LAS VEGAS—During his keynote and a press conference that followed here at the Black Hat information security conference, In-Q-Tel Chief Information Security Officer Dan Geer expressed concern about the growing threat of botnets powered by home and small office routers. The inexpensive Wi-Fi routers commonly used for home Internet access—which are rarely patched by their owners—are an easy target for hackers, Geer said, and could be used to construct a botnet that “could probably take down the Internet.” Asked by Ars if he considered home routers to be the equivalent of critical infrastructure as a security priority, he answered in the affirmative.

via Security expert calls home routers a clear and present danger | Ars Technica.

When science gets it wrong: Let the light shine in | The Economist

SCIENTISTS make much of the fact that their work is scrutinised anonymously by some of their peers before it is published. This “peer review” is supposed to spot mistakes and thus keep the whole process honest. The peers in question, though, are necessarily few in number, are busy with their own work, are expected to act unpaid—and are often the rivals of those whose work they are scrutinising. And so, by a mixture of deliberation and technological pressure, the system is starting to change. The internet means anyone can appoint himself a peer and criticise work that has entered the public domain. And two recent incidents have shown how valuable this can be.

via When science gets it wrong: Let the light shine in | The Economist.